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The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants. / Salvatore, Silvia; Ripepi, Antonio; Huysentruyt, Koen; van de Maele, Kristel; Nosetti, Luana; Agosti, Massimo; Salvatoni, Alessandro; Vandenplas, Yvan.

In: Paediatric Drugs, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 575-583.

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Harvard

Salvatore, S, Ripepi, A, Huysentruyt, K, van de Maele, K, Nosetti, L, Agosti, M, Salvatoni, A & Vandenplas, Y 2018, 'The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants', Paediatric Drugs, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 575-583. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40272-018-0314-0

APA

Vancouver

Salvatore S, Ripepi A, Huysentruyt K, van de Maele K, Nosetti L, Agosti M et al. The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants. Paediatric Drugs. 2018 Dec 1;20(6):575-583. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40272-018-0314-0

Author

Salvatore, Silvia ; Ripepi, Antonio ; Huysentruyt, Koen ; van de Maele, Kristel ; Nosetti, Luana ; Agosti, Massimo ; Salvatoni, Alessandro ; Vandenplas, Yvan. / The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants. In: Paediatric Drugs. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 575-583.

BibTeX

@article{f4064b57d89f49c582ee9ead03fd9c89,
title = "The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Guidelines are contradictory regarding the use of alginate in infants with persisting gastroesophageal reflux (GER). While The British National Institute for Health and Care (NICE) guidelines consider alginate as a treatment option, the guidelines of the European and North-American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN, NASPGHAN) do not recommend alginates.AIMS: We assessed the efficacy of alginate to reduce GER episodes in infants.METHODS: In a prospective, observational study, we consecutively enrolled all infants referred for pH-multiple intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) recording because of persisting GER symptoms not responsive to behavior and dietetic modifications. A 48-h pH-MII was performed in all infants; a baseline recording was performed during the first 24 h while magnesium or sodium alginate was administered during the second 24 h. The primary endpoint was the difference in the total number of GER episodes per 24 h between the baseline day and the second day during which the alginate was administered. The secondary outcome was the difference in symptoms between each period. We also compared other pH-MII data from before and during alginate administration.RESULTS: We recruited 43 infants (median age 68 days, range 25-306); three pH-MII tracings were excluded because of artifacts. The median number of all MII reflux episodes was significantly reduced during alginate administration (76.0 vs 69.5; p < 0.001). Crying-fussiness, cough and regurgitation episodes all significantly improved during alginate administration (p = 0.00012; p = 0.005 and p = 0.04, respectively). The following MII parameters also decreased during the alginate administration: acid (19.0 vs 14.5; p < 0.04), non-acid (52.0 vs 49.5; p < 0.004), proximal GER episodes (46.0 vs 41.4; p < 0.007), and bolus exposure index (1.9 vs 1.6; p = 0.002). At least three out of seven pH-MII parameters decreased by > 10{\%} during the alginate period in 31/40 infants (77.5{\%}), without a significant difference between magnesium and sodium alginate.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that alginate significantly decreases the number and extension of both acid and non-acid reflux episodes and associated symptoms in infants.",
keywords = "Aged, Alginates/adverse effects, Case-Control Studies, Female, Gastroesophageal Reflux/drug therapy, Humans, Infant, Male, Prospective Studies",
author = "Silvia Salvatore and Antonio Ripepi and Koen Huysentruyt and {van de Maele}, Kristel and Luana Nosetti and Massimo Agosti and Alessandro Salvatoni and Yvan Vandenplas",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40272-018-0314-0",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "575--583",
journal = "Paediatric Drugs",
issn = "1174-5878",
publisher = "Adis International Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Effect of Alginate in Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants

AU - Salvatore, Silvia

AU - Ripepi, Antonio

AU - Huysentruyt, Koen

AU - van de Maele, Kristel

AU - Nosetti, Luana

AU - Agosti, Massimo

AU - Salvatoni, Alessandro

AU - Vandenplas, Yvan

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Guidelines are contradictory regarding the use of alginate in infants with persisting gastroesophageal reflux (GER). While The British National Institute for Health and Care (NICE) guidelines consider alginate as a treatment option, the guidelines of the European and North-American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN, NASPGHAN) do not recommend alginates.AIMS: We assessed the efficacy of alginate to reduce GER episodes in infants.METHODS: In a prospective, observational study, we consecutively enrolled all infants referred for pH-multiple intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) recording because of persisting GER symptoms not responsive to behavior and dietetic modifications. A 48-h pH-MII was performed in all infants; a baseline recording was performed during the first 24 h while magnesium or sodium alginate was administered during the second 24 h. The primary endpoint was the difference in the total number of GER episodes per 24 h between the baseline day and the second day during which the alginate was administered. The secondary outcome was the difference in symptoms between each period. We also compared other pH-MII data from before and during alginate administration.RESULTS: We recruited 43 infants (median age 68 days, range 25-306); three pH-MII tracings were excluded because of artifacts. The median number of all MII reflux episodes was significantly reduced during alginate administration (76.0 vs 69.5; p < 0.001). Crying-fussiness, cough and regurgitation episodes all significantly improved during alginate administration (p = 0.00012; p = 0.005 and p = 0.04, respectively). The following MII parameters also decreased during the alginate administration: acid (19.0 vs 14.5; p < 0.04), non-acid (52.0 vs 49.5; p < 0.004), proximal GER episodes (46.0 vs 41.4; p < 0.007), and bolus exposure index (1.9 vs 1.6; p = 0.002). At least three out of seven pH-MII parameters decreased by > 10% during the alginate period in 31/40 infants (77.5%), without a significant difference between magnesium and sodium alginate.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that alginate significantly decreases the number and extension of both acid and non-acid reflux episodes and associated symptoms in infants.

AB - BACKGROUND: Guidelines are contradictory regarding the use of alginate in infants with persisting gastroesophageal reflux (GER). While The British National Institute for Health and Care (NICE) guidelines consider alginate as a treatment option, the guidelines of the European and North-American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN, NASPGHAN) do not recommend alginates.AIMS: We assessed the efficacy of alginate to reduce GER episodes in infants.METHODS: In a prospective, observational study, we consecutively enrolled all infants referred for pH-multiple intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) recording because of persisting GER symptoms not responsive to behavior and dietetic modifications. A 48-h pH-MII was performed in all infants; a baseline recording was performed during the first 24 h while magnesium or sodium alginate was administered during the second 24 h. The primary endpoint was the difference in the total number of GER episodes per 24 h between the baseline day and the second day during which the alginate was administered. The secondary outcome was the difference in symptoms between each period. We also compared other pH-MII data from before and during alginate administration.RESULTS: We recruited 43 infants (median age 68 days, range 25-306); three pH-MII tracings were excluded because of artifacts. The median number of all MII reflux episodes was significantly reduced during alginate administration (76.0 vs 69.5; p < 0.001). Crying-fussiness, cough and regurgitation episodes all significantly improved during alginate administration (p = 0.00012; p = 0.005 and p = 0.04, respectively). The following MII parameters also decreased during the alginate administration: acid (19.0 vs 14.5; p < 0.04), non-acid (52.0 vs 49.5; p < 0.004), proximal GER episodes (46.0 vs 41.4; p < 0.007), and bolus exposure index (1.9 vs 1.6; p = 0.002). At least three out of seven pH-MII parameters decreased by > 10% during the alginate period in 31/40 infants (77.5%), without a significant difference between magnesium and sodium alginate.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that alginate significantly decreases the number and extension of both acid and non-acid reflux episodes and associated symptoms in infants.

KW - Aged

KW - Alginates/adverse effects

KW - Case-Control Studies

KW - Female

KW - Gastroesophageal Reflux/drug therapy

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Male

KW - Prospective Studies

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053373610&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40272-018-0314-0

DO - 10.1007/s40272-018-0314-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 30182358

VL - 20

SP - 575

EP - 583

JO - Paediatric Drugs

JF - Paediatric Drugs

SN - 1174-5878

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 39977111