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@article{080608c841344bc4be486f015661fb8b,
title = "Strength endurance training but not intensive strength training reduces senescence-prone T-cells in peripheral blood in community-dwelling elderly women",
abstract = "Ageing is characterized by a progressive decline in immune function known as immunosenescence (IS). While the causes of IS are likely to be multi-factorial, an age-associated accumulation of senescent T-cells and decreased na{\"i}ve T-cell repertoire are key contributors to the phenomenon. On the other hand, there is a growing consensus that physical exercise may improve immune response in ageing. However, the optimum training modality required to obtain beneficial adaptations in older subjects is lacking. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of exercise modality on T-cell phenotypes in older women. 100 women (aged ≥65 years) were randomized to either intensive strength training (80{\%} of one-repetition maximum (1RM)), strength endurance training (SET, 40{\%} 1RM), or control (stretching exercise) for 2-3 times/week during 6 weeks. The T-cell percentages and absolute counts were determined using flow cytometry and hematology analyzer. C-reactive protein was measured using immunonephelometry. We report for the first time that 6 weeks of SET significantly decreased the basal percentage and absolute counts of senescence-prone T-cells, which was positively related to the number of training sessions performed. Conceivably, training protocols with many repetitions - at a sufficiently high external resistance - might assist the reduction of senescence-prone T-cells in older women.",
keywords = "ageing, immune function, immunosenescence, Women",
author = "{Cao Dinh}, Hung and Rose Njemini and Onyema, {Oscar Okwudiri} and Ingo Beyer and Keliane Liberman and {De Dobbeleer}, Liza and Wim Renmans and {Vander Meeren}, Sam and Kristin Jochmans and Andreas Delaere and Veerle Knoop and Ivan Bautmans",
note = "{\circledC} The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/gly229",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "1870--1878",
journal = "The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Strength endurance training but not intensive strength training reduces senescence-prone T-cells in peripheral blood in community-dwelling elderly women

AU - Cao Dinh, Hung

AU - Njemini, Rose

AU - Onyema, Oscar Okwudiri

AU - Beyer, Ingo

AU - Liberman, Keliane

AU - De Dobbeleer, Liza

AU - Renmans, Wim

AU - Vander Meeren, Sam

AU - Jochmans, Kristin

AU - Delaere, Andreas

AU - Knoop, Veerle

AU - Bautmans, Ivan

N1 - © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2019/11/13

Y1 - 2019/11/13

N2 - Ageing is characterized by a progressive decline in immune function known as immunosenescence (IS). While the causes of IS are likely to be multi-factorial, an age-associated accumulation of senescent T-cells and decreased naïve T-cell repertoire are key contributors to the phenomenon. On the other hand, there is a growing consensus that physical exercise may improve immune response in ageing. However, the optimum training modality required to obtain beneficial adaptations in older subjects is lacking. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of exercise modality on T-cell phenotypes in older women. 100 women (aged ≥65 years) were randomized to either intensive strength training (80% of one-repetition maximum (1RM)), strength endurance training (SET, 40% 1RM), or control (stretching exercise) for 2-3 times/week during 6 weeks. The T-cell percentages and absolute counts were determined using flow cytometry and hematology analyzer. C-reactive protein was measured using immunonephelometry. We report for the first time that 6 weeks of SET significantly decreased the basal percentage and absolute counts of senescence-prone T-cells, which was positively related to the number of training sessions performed. Conceivably, training protocols with many repetitions - at a sufficiently high external resistance - might assist the reduction of senescence-prone T-cells in older women.

AB - Ageing is characterized by a progressive decline in immune function known as immunosenescence (IS). While the causes of IS are likely to be multi-factorial, an age-associated accumulation of senescent T-cells and decreased naïve T-cell repertoire are key contributors to the phenomenon. On the other hand, there is a growing consensus that physical exercise may improve immune response in ageing. However, the optimum training modality required to obtain beneficial adaptations in older subjects is lacking. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of exercise modality on T-cell phenotypes in older women. 100 women (aged ≥65 years) were randomized to either intensive strength training (80% of one-repetition maximum (1RM)), strength endurance training (SET, 40% 1RM), or control (stretching exercise) for 2-3 times/week during 6 weeks. The T-cell percentages and absolute counts were determined using flow cytometry and hematology analyzer. C-reactive protein was measured using immunonephelometry. We report for the first time that 6 weeks of SET significantly decreased the basal percentage and absolute counts of senescence-prone T-cells, which was positively related to the number of training sessions performed. Conceivably, training protocols with many repetitions - at a sufficiently high external resistance - might assist the reduction of senescence-prone T-cells in older women.

KW - ageing

KW - immune function

KW - immunosenescence

KW - Women

UR - https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/advance-article/doi/10.1093/gerona/gly229/5114648

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/strength-endurance-training-not-intensive-strength-training-reduces-senescenceprone-tcells-periphera

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/gly229

DO - 10.1093/gerona/gly229

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 1870

EP - 1878

JO - The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

JF - The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 39873708