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Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence". / bierman, olivia; Kuchenmuller, Tanja; Paniset, Ulysses; Leys, Mark.

In: International Journal of Health Governance, Vol. 23, No. 2, 15.02.2018, p. 120-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

bierman, O, Kuchenmuller, T, Paniset, U & Leys, M 2018, 'Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence"' International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 120-133. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063

APA

bierman, O., Kuchenmuller, T., Paniset, U., & Leys, M. (2018). Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence". International Journal of Health Governance, 23(2), 120-133. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063

Vancouver

bierman O, Kuchenmuller T, Paniset U, Leys M. Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence". International Journal of Health Governance. 2018 Feb 15;23(2):120-133. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063

Author

bierman, olivia ; Kuchenmuller, Tanja ; Paniset, Ulysses ; Leys, Mark. / Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence". In: International Journal of Health Governance. 2018 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 120-133.

BibTeX

@article{01a7cbbaacca4b30a60268a2f2c79916,
title = "Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence{"}",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand facilitators’ perceived role and influence on a policy dialogue’s (PD) process and impact. PDs enable interactions between policy makers, researchers and other stakeholders – one of the factors associated with promoting evidence-informed policy making. Design/methodology/approach: This is an exploratory study based on semi-structured interviews with ten key informants from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, North and South America. Participants were purposefully sampled based on their experience in facilitating or observing PDs organized by the WHO’s Evidence-informed Policy Network. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: A successful PD relies on a structured process used to catalyze impact. Facilitators contribute to a successful PD through their facilitation skills, for example, helping to get to an informed judgment; knowledge, for example, about the health system; attitudes, for example, valuing the PD process over its outcomes; and personal attributes, for example, credibility. Facilitators’ involvement in preparatory and follow-up actions are equally paramount for a PD’s success. Challenges in implementing PDs can be prevented/attenuated, for example, through stakeholder analysis to identify suitable PD participants, and anticipate power constellations or potential conflicts. Research limitations/implications: Research should focus on the overall process of a PD – especially on preparation and follow-up activities and their influence on a PD’s success. Originality/value: Informed by harnessing practical experiences, this paper outlines facilitators’ skills, attributes, attitudes, knowledge and how these can be used to influence a PD’s success.",
keywords = "Evidence-based practice, Governance structures, Health policy, Leadership, Public health, Training",
author = "olivia bierman and Tanja Kuchenmuller and Ulysses Paniset and Mark Leys",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "120--133",
journal = "International Journal of Health Governance",
issn = "2059-4631",
publisher = "Emerald",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Policy dialogues: facilitators’ perceived role and influence"

AU - bierman, olivia

AU - Kuchenmuller, Tanja

AU - Paniset, Ulysses

AU - Leys, Mark

PY - 2018/2/15

Y1 - 2018/2/15

N2 - Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand facilitators’ perceived role and influence on a policy dialogue’s (PD) process and impact. PDs enable interactions between policy makers, researchers and other stakeholders – one of the factors associated with promoting evidence-informed policy making. Design/methodology/approach: This is an exploratory study based on semi-structured interviews with ten key informants from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, North and South America. Participants were purposefully sampled based on their experience in facilitating or observing PDs organized by the WHO’s Evidence-informed Policy Network. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: A successful PD relies on a structured process used to catalyze impact. Facilitators contribute to a successful PD through their facilitation skills, for example, helping to get to an informed judgment; knowledge, for example, about the health system; attitudes, for example, valuing the PD process over its outcomes; and personal attributes, for example, credibility. Facilitators’ involvement in preparatory and follow-up actions are equally paramount for a PD’s success. Challenges in implementing PDs can be prevented/attenuated, for example, through stakeholder analysis to identify suitable PD participants, and anticipate power constellations or potential conflicts. Research limitations/implications: Research should focus on the overall process of a PD – especially on preparation and follow-up activities and their influence on a PD’s success. Originality/value: Informed by harnessing practical experiences, this paper outlines facilitators’ skills, attributes, attitudes, knowledge and how these can be used to influence a PD’s success.

AB - Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand facilitators’ perceived role and influence on a policy dialogue’s (PD) process and impact. PDs enable interactions between policy makers, researchers and other stakeholders – one of the factors associated with promoting evidence-informed policy making. Design/methodology/approach: This is an exploratory study based on semi-structured interviews with ten key informants from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, North and South America. Participants were purposefully sampled based on their experience in facilitating or observing PDs organized by the WHO’s Evidence-informed Policy Network. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative method. Findings: A successful PD relies on a structured process used to catalyze impact. Facilitators contribute to a successful PD through their facilitation skills, for example, helping to get to an informed judgment; knowledge, for example, about the health system; attitudes, for example, valuing the PD process over its outcomes; and personal attributes, for example, credibility. Facilitators’ involvement in preparatory and follow-up actions are equally paramount for a PD’s success. Challenges in implementing PDs can be prevented/attenuated, for example, through stakeholder analysis to identify suitable PD participants, and anticipate power constellations or potential conflicts. Research limitations/implications: Research should focus on the overall process of a PD – especially on preparation and follow-up activities and their influence on a PD’s success. Originality/value: Informed by harnessing practical experiences, this paper outlines facilitators’ skills, attributes, attitudes, knowledge and how these can be used to influence a PD’s success.

KW - Evidence-based practice

KW - Governance structures

KW - Health policy

KW - Leadership

KW - Public health

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85045181201&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063

DO - 10.1108/IJHG-12-2017-0063

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 120

EP - 133

JO - International Journal of Health Governance

JF - International Journal of Health Governance

SN - 2059-4631

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 37908222