When solid biomass is externally combusted for the production of power like in steam cycles, Organic Rankine cycles or Stirling engines the conversion efficiencies are known to be limited. It is however possible, as shown in previous work of the authors, to combine the advantages of external firing with the potential high efficiency of gas turbine cycles through co-utilization of natural gas and biomass. Heat from a biomass combustor can be utilized to partially reform natural gas and steam into a hydrogen rich syngas. This syngas can be used in most common gas turbine cycles while maintaining high efficiencies and avoiding costly technological developments.
To demonstrate and proof this concept, a pilot and test facility is being built around an existing microturbine in the university laboratory. Part of the natural gas will be reformed to syngas and used in the engine. This will have a profound effect on engine operation reflected in the marginal efficiency of the biomass - because of the high water and hydrogen content of the syngas and the variable shaft speed of the microturbine. In this paper. results of performed off-design calculations are presented and the effects of partial primary steam reforming on microturbine performance are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationECOS 2007
PublisherPadova
Pages11-18
Number of pages8
Volume1
ISBN (Print)88-89884-08-8
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2007
EventFinds and Results from the Swedish Cyprus Expedition: A Gender Perspective at the Medelhavsmuseet - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: 21 Sep 200925 Sep 2009

Conference

ConferenceFinds and Results from the Swedish Cyprus Expedition: A Gender Perspective at the Medelhavsmuseet
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period21/09/0925/09/09

    Research areas

  • microturbine, syngas, biomass, steam reforming

ID: 1595503