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“Let them in!” Humanitarian work as political activism? The case of the Maximiliaan refugee camp in Brussels. / Lafaut, Dirk; Coene, Gily.

In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, Vol. 17, No. 2, 03.04.2019, p. 185-203.

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@article{0268f7df21574e1db0753fd72e0526d2,
title = "“Let them in!” Humanitarian work as political activism?: The case of the Maximiliaan refugee camp in Brussels.",
abstract = "Humanitarian aid projects associated with the emergence of refugee camps within European territories are generally perceived as apolitical. Scholars however, are increasingly questioning this view, pointing to many, often untold, ways in which humanitarianism interacts with the politics of migration and border enforcement. This article examines the case of a temporary refugee camp set up in Brussels in September 2015. We show how organizational and spatiotemporal particularities, as well as media framing of the humanitarian assistance, led to controversy, civil initiatives, and hyperpoliticization, eventually calling the state to take responsibility for the refugees, but simultaneously silenced other explicit political responses.",
keywords = "Agamben, Asylum seekers, Belgium, Maximiliaan Park, humanitarianism, hyper-politicization, refugee camp",
author = "Dirk Lafaut and Gily Coene",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/15562948.2018.1430283",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "185--203",
journal = "Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies",
issn = "1556-2948",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - “Let them in!” Humanitarian work as political activism?

T2 - The case of the Maximiliaan refugee camp in Brussels.

AU - Lafaut, Dirk

AU - Coene, Gily

PY - 2019/4/3

Y1 - 2019/4/3

N2 - Humanitarian aid projects associated with the emergence of refugee camps within European territories are generally perceived as apolitical. Scholars however, are increasingly questioning this view, pointing to many, often untold, ways in which humanitarianism interacts with the politics of migration and border enforcement. This article examines the case of a temporary refugee camp set up in Brussels in September 2015. We show how organizational and spatiotemporal particularities, as well as media framing of the humanitarian assistance, led to controversy, civil initiatives, and hyperpoliticization, eventually calling the state to take responsibility for the refugees, but simultaneously silenced other explicit political responses.

AB - Humanitarian aid projects associated with the emergence of refugee camps within European territories are generally perceived as apolitical. Scholars however, are increasingly questioning this view, pointing to many, often untold, ways in which humanitarianism interacts with the politics of migration and border enforcement. This article examines the case of a temporary refugee camp set up in Brussels in September 2015. We show how organizational and spatiotemporal particularities, as well as media framing of the humanitarian assistance, led to controversy, civil initiatives, and hyperpoliticization, eventually calling the state to take responsibility for the refugees, but simultaneously silenced other explicit political responses.

KW - Agamben

KW - Asylum seekers

KW - Belgium

KW - Maximiliaan Park

KW - humanitarianism

KW - hyper-politicization

KW - refugee camp

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065088692&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15562948.2018.1430283

DO - 10.1080/15562948.2018.1430283

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 185

EP - 203

JO - Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies

JF - Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies

SN - 1556-2948

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 36359894