This paper explores how households organize the process of e-grocery buying in a click-and-collect context. Following a multi-method approach, this research aims to gain an in-depth understanding of the allocation of the two main subtasks (the online ordering and the picking-up). We first carried out exploratory qualitative research and conducted in-depth interviews with 15 households in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium), who all use Collect & Go, Belgium’s most popular online grocery service. In a second step, we exploit the answers of 112 users of Belgian click-and-collect services in a quantitative follow-up survey. Whereas our findings support existing evidence on the increased involvement of men in household management, both our qualitative and quantitative study confirm that women today are still the main responsible for grocery shopping. In the majority of the households, the female is perceived to be the main responsible partner. Most females are – at least to some extent – in charge of the online ordering, while the collecting of the groceries is more equally divided across genders. However, we find that the reasons for this task division do not relate solely to traditional gender roles, but also involve practical considerations, such as the availability of a car and flexible working hours. Finally, we find that ‘presence of (young) children’ impacts the number of partners involved in the process of e-grocery buying.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication26th Recent Advances in Retailing & Services Science Conference
EditorsSoora Rasouli, Harry Timmermans
Place of PublicationEstonia: Tallinn
Number of pages19
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 46294256