Standard

How does precarious employment relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A gender and cross-national perspective. / Puig Barrachina, Vanesa; Vanroelen, Christophe; Martinez, Jose-Miguel; Vives, Alejandra; De Moortel, Deborah; Benach, Joan.

In: European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 24, No. suppl 2, 31.10.2014, p. 333.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract (Journal)

Harvard

Puig Barrachina, V, Vanroelen, C, Martinez, J-M, Vives, A, De Moortel, D & Benach, J 2014, 'How does precarious employment relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A gender and cross-national perspective', European Journal of Public Health, vol. 24, no. suppl 2, pp. 333.

APA

Vancouver

Author

Puig Barrachina, Vanesa ; Vanroelen, Christophe ; Martinez, Jose-Miguel ; Vives, Alejandra ; De Moortel, Deborah ; Benach, Joan. / How does precarious employment relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A gender and cross-national perspective. In: European Journal of Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. suppl 2. pp. 333.

BibTeX

@article{3e5d9f23f7a6474fa1534355fa28c2dc,
title = "How does precarious employment relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A gender and cross-national perspective",
abstract = "Background Precarious employment (PE) is becoming an increasingly important social determinant of health. PE refers to a multidimensional concept grasping into the degrading of employment conditions and relations. It encompasses the following dimensions: employment stability, income, rights and social protection, training, control over worktime, collective bargaining and interpersonal power relations. Given that female workers fall in the intersection of two unequal power relationships, employment and patriarchal gender relationships, PE could have a greater impact on health and well-being among women, especially in countries with a less developed welfare state. Methods This study aims to analyse the association of PE with perceived work-related health and job satisfaction in the EU27 by gender and welfare regimes, using the European Working Conditions Survey 2005. Logistic regression is used to test the association of PE indicators with the outcomes, stratified by sex and then by country group and sex (adjusted by age and country). Results Consistent associations are found, among both men (M) and women (W), between PE indicators and job dissatisfaction, for example lack of information on health and safety (OR 3.62, 95{\%} CI = 2.56- 5.12 M; OR 4.67, 95{\%} CI = 3.39-6.44 W) and working long hours (>48 h) (OR 1.55, 95{\%} CI = 1.55-2.13 M; OR 2.43, 95{\%} CI 1.58-3.74 W). Fewer indicators are associated with poor work-related health, e.g. schedule unpredictability (OR 1.84, 95{\%} CI 1.28-2.64 M; OR, 2.49, 95{\%} CI 1.57-3.95). Most of these associations are not statistically significant in Social-democratic countries and no gender differences are found. Stronger associations were found among women in Southern and Eastern countries. Conclusions PE indicators show consistent associations with job dissatisfaction, although fewer with poor-work related health. State family policies and social protection, might be modifiying these results. More flexible workig schedules might have negative health and wellbeing related consequences, especially among women in countries where the traditional family model prevails, and where public care infrastructure is weak.",
keywords = "job satisfaction",
author = "{Puig Barrachina}, Vanesa and Christophe Vanroelen and Jose-Miguel Martinez and Alejandra Vives and {De Moortel}, Deborah and Joan Benach",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "333",
journal = "European Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1101-1262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "suppl 2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does precarious employment relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A gender and cross-national perspective

AU - Puig Barrachina, Vanesa

AU - Vanroelen, Christophe

AU - Martinez, Jose-Miguel

AU - Vives, Alejandra

AU - De Moortel, Deborah

AU - Benach, Joan

PY - 2014/10/31

Y1 - 2014/10/31

N2 - Background Precarious employment (PE) is becoming an increasingly important social determinant of health. PE refers to a multidimensional concept grasping into the degrading of employment conditions and relations. It encompasses the following dimensions: employment stability, income, rights and social protection, training, control over worktime, collective bargaining and interpersonal power relations. Given that female workers fall in the intersection of two unequal power relationships, employment and patriarchal gender relationships, PE could have a greater impact on health and well-being among women, especially in countries with a less developed welfare state. Methods This study aims to analyse the association of PE with perceived work-related health and job satisfaction in the EU27 by gender and welfare regimes, using the European Working Conditions Survey 2005. Logistic regression is used to test the association of PE indicators with the outcomes, stratified by sex and then by country group and sex (adjusted by age and country). Results Consistent associations are found, among both men (M) and women (W), between PE indicators and job dissatisfaction, for example lack of information on health and safety (OR 3.62, 95% CI = 2.56- 5.12 M; OR 4.67, 95% CI = 3.39-6.44 W) and working long hours (>48 h) (OR 1.55, 95% CI = 1.55-2.13 M; OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.58-3.74 W). Fewer indicators are associated with poor work-related health, e.g. schedule unpredictability (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.28-2.64 M; OR, 2.49, 95% CI 1.57-3.95). Most of these associations are not statistically significant in Social-democratic countries and no gender differences are found. Stronger associations were found among women in Southern and Eastern countries. Conclusions PE indicators show consistent associations with job dissatisfaction, although fewer with poor-work related health. State family policies and social protection, might be modifiying these results. More flexible workig schedules might have negative health and wellbeing related consequences, especially among women in countries where the traditional family model prevails, and where public care infrastructure is weak.

AB - Background Precarious employment (PE) is becoming an increasingly important social determinant of health. PE refers to a multidimensional concept grasping into the degrading of employment conditions and relations. It encompasses the following dimensions: employment stability, income, rights and social protection, training, control over worktime, collective bargaining and interpersonal power relations. Given that female workers fall in the intersection of two unequal power relationships, employment and patriarchal gender relationships, PE could have a greater impact on health and well-being among women, especially in countries with a less developed welfare state. Methods This study aims to analyse the association of PE with perceived work-related health and job satisfaction in the EU27 by gender and welfare regimes, using the European Working Conditions Survey 2005. Logistic regression is used to test the association of PE indicators with the outcomes, stratified by sex and then by country group and sex (adjusted by age and country). Results Consistent associations are found, among both men (M) and women (W), between PE indicators and job dissatisfaction, for example lack of information on health and safety (OR 3.62, 95% CI = 2.56- 5.12 M; OR 4.67, 95% CI = 3.39-6.44 W) and working long hours (>48 h) (OR 1.55, 95% CI = 1.55-2.13 M; OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.58-3.74 W). Fewer indicators are associated with poor work-related health, e.g. schedule unpredictability (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.28-2.64 M; OR, 2.49, 95% CI 1.57-3.95). Most of these associations are not statistically significant in Social-democratic countries and no gender differences are found. Stronger associations were found among women in Southern and Eastern countries. Conclusions PE indicators show consistent associations with job dissatisfaction, although fewer with poor-work related health. State family policies and social protection, might be modifiying these results. More flexible workig schedules might have negative health and wellbeing related consequences, especially among women in countries where the traditional family model prevails, and where public care infrastructure is weak.

KW - job satisfaction

M3 - Meeting abstract (Journal)

VL - 24

SP - 333

JO - European Journal of Public Health

JF - European Journal of Public Health

SN - 1101-1262

IS - suppl 2

ER -

ID: 2499014