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Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility. / Braem, Senne; Egner, Tobias.

In: Current Directions in Psychological Science, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.12.2018, p. 470-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Braem, S & Egner, T 2018, 'Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility' Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 470-476. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475

APA

Braem, S., & Egner, T. (2018). Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 27(6), 470-476. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475

Vancouver

Braem S, Egner T. Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 2018 Dec 1;27(6):470-476. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475

Author

Braem, Senne ; Egner, Tobias. / Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility. In: Current Directions in Psychological Science. 2018 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 470-476.

BibTeX

@article{fd477dd945984da2a78dd8680fac4479,
title = "Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility",
abstract = "Cognitive flexibility refers to the ability to quickly reconfigure our mind, like when we switch between different tasks. This review highlights recent evidence showing that cognitive flexibility can be conditioned by simple incentives typically known to drive lower-level learning, such as stimulus-response associations. Cognitive flexibility can also become associated with, and triggered by, bottom-up contextual cues in our environment, including subliminal cues. Therefore, we suggest that the control functions that mediate cognitive flexibility are grounded in, and guided by, basic associative learning mechanisms, and abide by the same learning principles as more low-level forms of behavior. Such a learning perspective on cognitive flexibility offers new directions and important implications for further research, theory, and applications.",
keywords = "associative learning, cognitive control, cognitive flexibility, reinforcement learning, task switching",
author = "Senne Braem and Tobias Egner",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "470--476",
journal = "Current Directions in Psychological Science",
issn = "0963-7214",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Getting a grip on cognitive flexibility

AU - Braem, Senne

AU - Egner, Tobias

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Cognitive flexibility refers to the ability to quickly reconfigure our mind, like when we switch between different tasks. This review highlights recent evidence showing that cognitive flexibility can be conditioned by simple incentives typically known to drive lower-level learning, such as stimulus-response associations. Cognitive flexibility can also become associated with, and triggered by, bottom-up contextual cues in our environment, including subliminal cues. Therefore, we suggest that the control functions that mediate cognitive flexibility are grounded in, and guided by, basic associative learning mechanisms, and abide by the same learning principles as more low-level forms of behavior. Such a learning perspective on cognitive flexibility offers new directions and important implications for further research, theory, and applications.

AB - Cognitive flexibility refers to the ability to quickly reconfigure our mind, like when we switch between different tasks. This review highlights recent evidence showing that cognitive flexibility can be conditioned by simple incentives typically known to drive lower-level learning, such as stimulus-response associations. Cognitive flexibility can also become associated with, and triggered by, bottom-up contextual cues in our environment, including subliminal cues. Therefore, we suggest that the control functions that mediate cognitive flexibility are grounded in, and guided by, basic associative learning mechanisms, and abide by the same learning principles as more low-level forms of behavior. Such a learning perspective on cognitive flexibility offers new directions and important implications for further research, theory, and applications.

KW - associative learning

KW - cognitive control

KW - cognitive flexibility

KW - reinforcement learning

KW - task switching

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058181000&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475

DO - https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721418787475

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 470

EP - 476

JO - Current Directions in Psychological Science

JF - Current Directions in Psychological Science

SN - 0963-7214

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 40433408