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Cooperation on capability development. / Mattelaer, Alexander.

The EU and NATO: The essential partners. ed. / Gustav Lindstrom; Thierry Tardy. Paris : EU Institute for Security Studies , 2019. p. 37-43.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Mattelaer, A 2019, Cooperation on capability development. in G Lindstrom & T Tardy (eds), The EU and NATO: The essential partners. EU Institute for Security Studies , Paris, pp. 37-43.

APA

Mattelaer, A. (2019). Cooperation on capability development. In G. Lindstrom, & T. Tardy (Eds.), The EU and NATO: The essential partners (pp. 37-43). Paris: EU Institute for Security Studies .

Vancouver

Mattelaer A. Cooperation on capability development. In Lindstrom G, Tardy T, editors, The EU and NATO: The essential partners. Paris: EU Institute for Security Studies . 2019. p. 37-43

Author

Mattelaer, Alexander. / Cooperation on capability development. The EU and NATO: The essential partners. editor / Gustav Lindstrom ; Thierry Tardy. Paris : EU Institute for Security Studies , 2019. pp. 37-43

BibTeX

@inbook{a17bd4f9915d4c928fa906b5198d2626,
title = "Cooperation on capability development",
abstract = "The 2016 EU-NATO Joint Declaration listed an urgent need to ‘develop coherent, complementary and interoperable defence capabilities of EU Member States and NATO Allies, as well as multilateral projects’. This statement mirrors the ambition contained in the 2016 EU Global Strategy to play a role in deterring external threats and pursuing an autonomous ability to safeguard security both within and beyond Europe’s borders. Any meaningful attempt at defence planning, however, necessitates a clear level of ambition and an associated force planning construct. To date, the latter exists only in the form of NATO’s successive Political Guidance documents and their translation into strategy and doctrine by the Military Committee. This chapter discusses what has been achieved in terms of capability development over the past two years, what challenges the EU and NATO face in strengthening their cooperation, and what the way forward may look like.",
keywords = "NATO, EU, CSDP, capability development",
author = "Alexander Mattelaer",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "8",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-92-9198-837-2",
pages = "37--43",
editor = "Gustav Lindstrom and Thierry Tardy",
booktitle = "The EU and NATO",
publisher = "EU Institute for Security Studies",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Cooperation on capability development

AU - Mattelaer, Alexander

PY - 2019/8/8

Y1 - 2019/8/8

N2 - The 2016 EU-NATO Joint Declaration listed an urgent need to ‘develop coherent, complementary and interoperable defence capabilities of EU Member States and NATO Allies, as well as multilateral projects’. This statement mirrors the ambition contained in the 2016 EU Global Strategy to play a role in deterring external threats and pursuing an autonomous ability to safeguard security both within and beyond Europe’s borders. Any meaningful attempt at defence planning, however, necessitates a clear level of ambition and an associated force planning construct. To date, the latter exists only in the form of NATO’s successive Political Guidance documents and their translation into strategy and doctrine by the Military Committee. This chapter discusses what has been achieved in terms of capability development over the past two years, what challenges the EU and NATO face in strengthening their cooperation, and what the way forward may look like.

AB - The 2016 EU-NATO Joint Declaration listed an urgent need to ‘develop coherent, complementary and interoperable defence capabilities of EU Member States and NATO Allies, as well as multilateral projects’. This statement mirrors the ambition contained in the 2016 EU Global Strategy to play a role in deterring external threats and pursuing an autonomous ability to safeguard security both within and beyond Europe’s borders. Any meaningful attempt at defence planning, however, necessitates a clear level of ambition and an associated force planning construct. To date, the latter exists only in the form of NATO’s successive Political Guidance documents and their translation into strategy and doctrine by the Military Committee. This chapter discusses what has been achieved in terms of capability development over the past two years, what challenges the EU and NATO face in strengthening their cooperation, and what the way forward may look like.

KW - NATO

KW - EU

KW - CSDP

KW - capability development

M3 - Chapter

SN - 978-92-9198-837-2

SP - 37

EP - 43

BT - The EU and NATO

A2 - Lindstrom, Gustav

A2 - Tardy, Thierry

PB - EU Institute for Security Studies

CY - Paris

ER -

ID: 46726091