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@article{f2348ddc2a65423cb6018b1e11b60147,
title = "50 shades of colour: how thickness, iron redox and manganese/antimony contents influence perceived and intrinsic colour in Roman glass",
abstract = "Roman glass is studied here by means of optical absorption spectroscopy, in order to provide an objective method to quantitatively evaluate colour. The dataset is composed of 165 soda-lime silicate glass samples from various western European sites, mainly dated from the first to fourth century AD, and containing variable amounts of iron, manganese and/or antimony. Iron redox ratios and colour coordinates (based on the CIELab colour system) are determined and put in relation with the thickness of samples and their manganese/antimony contents. Results reveal thickness as a crucial parameter when discussing glass hues, thus leading to a differentiation between the ‘intrinsic’ and ‘perceived’ colour of glass objects (i.e. the colour of the object with the thickness normalised to 1 mm, and that with its original thickness, respectively). Apart from HIMT and purple glass, the concentration of ferrous iron appears to be correlated with a* — a colourimetric parameter determining how green the glass is. Significant relations of antimony/manganese contents versus iron redox and glass colour are also considered, resulting in quantitative arguments to entitle antimony-decoloured glass as the most oxidised and colourless glass.",
keywords = "Antimony, Colour, Iron redox, Manganese, Optical absorption spectroscopy, Roman glass",
author = "Bidegaray, {Anne Isabelle} and Karin Nys and Alberta Silvestri and Peter Cosyns and Wendy Meulebroeck and Herman Terryn and St{\'e}phane Godet and Andrea Ceglia",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1007/s12520-020-01050-0",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences",
issn = "1866-9557",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 50 shades of colour

T2 - how thickness, iron redox and manganese/antimony contents influence perceived and intrinsic colour in Roman glass

AU - Bidegaray, Anne Isabelle

AU - Nys, Karin

AU - Silvestri, Alberta

AU - Cosyns, Peter

AU - Meulebroeck, Wendy

AU - Terryn, Herman

AU - Godet, Stéphane

AU - Ceglia, Andrea

PY - 2020/5/13

Y1 - 2020/5/13

N2 - Roman glass is studied here by means of optical absorption spectroscopy, in order to provide an objective method to quantitatively evaluate colour. The dataset is composed of 165 soda-lime silicate glass samples from various western European sites, mainly dated from the first to fourth century AD, and containing variable amounts of iron, manganese and/or antimony. Iron redox ratios and colour coordinates (based on the CIELab colour system) are determined and put in relation with the thickness of samples and their manganese/antimony contents. Results reveal thickness as a crucial parameter when discussing glass hues, thus leading to a differentiation between the ‘intrinsic’ and ‘perceived’ colour of glass objects (i.e. the colour of the object with the thickness normalised to 1 mm, and that with its original thickness, respectively). Apart from HIMT and purple glass, the concentration of ferrous iron appears to be correlated with a* — a colourimetric parameter determining how green the glass is. Significant relations of antimony/manganese contents versus iron redox and glass colour are also considered, resulting in quantitative arguments to entitle antimony-decoloured glass as the most oxidised and colourless glass.

AB - Roman glass is studied here by means of optical absorption spectroscopy, in order to provide an objective method to quantitatively evaluate colour. The dataset is composed of 165 soda-lime silicate glass samples from various western European sites, mainly dated from the first to fourth century AD, and containing variable amounts of iron, manganese and/or antimony. Iron redox ratios and colour coordinates (based on the CIELab colour system) are determined and put in relation with the thickness of samples and their manganese/antimony contents. Results reveal thickness as a crucial parameter when discussing glass hues, thus leading to a differentiation between the ‘intrinsic’ and ‘perceived’ colour of glass objects (i.e. the colour of the object with the thickness normalised to 1 mm, and that with its original thickness, respectively). Apart from HIMT and purple glass, the concentration of ferrous iron appears to be correlated with a* — a colourimetric parameter determining how green the glass is. Significant relations of antimony/manganese contents versus iron redox and glass colour are also considered, resulting in quantitative arguments to entitle antimony-decoloured glass as the most oxidised and colourless glass.

KW - Antimony

KW - Colour

KW - Iron redox

KW - Manganese

KW - Optical absorption spectroscopy

KW - Roman glass

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084634536&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12520-020-01050-0

DO - 10.1007/s12520-020-01050-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85084634536

VL - 12

JO - Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences

JF - Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences

SN - 1866-9557

IS - 6

M1 - 109

ER -

ID: 52117157